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Let us Ponder the Quality of Activity

Steve Nation
June 2011


World Invocation Day on the Gemini full moon is a gem, a jewel of a day. The inner worlds are flooded with golden, radiant energies — stimulating all the seeds of the future of the new civilization. The human call for light, love and spiritual power to flow into and through all the fields of thinking, hoping, activity is at a peak — it can be felt in the ethers — especially I might add for those who tune in to the rich experience of the rhythmic sounding of the Great Invocation around the world every 15 minutes, night and day, during the World Invocation Day Vigil. And on the inner side there is a flow from the Christ, firing the world with the spirit of relationship. The radiation emanating from the Christ is pure energy, containing hidden gifts from the Buddha, and empowered with the blessing of all the Ancestors of all spiritual traditions. This is something of the majesty and mystery that can be sensed on World Invocation Day.

And yet our task is not to be lost in the radiant effusion of the energy flow, but to think it through into the world, to ponder meaning, significance, and to sense the stimulation it provides to the creative human spirit. Our work is to stand with humanity — it is easy to be drawn into a world of heights, of interiority and of the good the beautiful and the true in essence without also observing these energies in expression in the world. Full moon meditation work is about clarification of the way forward, recognizing, to the best of our ability, something of the task ahead. In our mind and heart we are to cultivate a sense of being fully engaged in the transition that is underway in human values, human creativity, human effort. We are not a neutral force in world affairs. As a global group of meditators we have a special responsibility to hold in the light all the human initiatives that we know to be part of the emerging civilization of wholeness and synthesis. That is all the initiatives in their immense diversity — initiatives from people's groups, from business, from local government, from national governments, from religious groups. We need to see, in our meditations and our invocations, an active dynamic bridging between the spirits of Goodness, Beauty and Truth and the human worlds of neighborhoods, cities, nations, regions and the global family of nations. We need to train our imagination to see light, love and power in expression in human activities that seek to address the deep causes of the problems of our time. We invoke Light, Love and Power and see these faces of Divinity shining through human initiatives to build true community, justice, sharing and beauty.

This is so important to have in mind on World Invocation Day when we use the Great Invocation to invoke the higher energies needed to empower human activity. The new civilization is being built, and must be built, first and foremost by us, humanity. Meditators often need to remind themselves of the need to be active, and engaged at every level of their being, in the building of the new civilization. The greatest spiritual problem facing this time of transition is the inertia and lethargy of those who dream of the future but have still to join the ranks of those who are actively working in the world for initiatives that foster the sprit of right relationship.

There is today such a wealth of human energy and creativity working for right values, for sharing, for unity in diversity. Our meditations need to be centred in the array of initiatives. Think of the courage, imagination and activity of millions of people involved in the Arab Spring. Think of movements active in all parts of the world: Transition Towns, the Global Commons, groups pushing for achievement of the UN's Millennium Development Goals, the Slow Food movement, the multi-faceted initiatives inspired by the teachings of Rudolf Steiner, think of the World Shift, the activities centred around International Day of Peace. Ponder the myriad local communities in the world right now facing economic difficulties and struggling in the most difficult circumstances to provide education that will inspire and foster wisdom as well as knowledge and to pioneer new sustainable ways of living. Think of the challenging conflicts shaped by the difficult economic times — in North and South.

On World Invocation Day it is right to consider the awakening of human energy that is struggling, working hard to give expression to values of wholeness and sustainability. There is joy for the workers, yes, but there is also frustration, sometimes exhaustion and a constant battle against inertia and a malaise of hopelessness.

We who know the value of meditation think of the work in terms that are different from most 'movements'. The phenomena that is of greatest interest is the goodwill that is arising from human hearts and expressing itself in organised activity. We recognise the Group of World Servers pioneering and leading the momentum to give birth to communities and cultures of enchantment, sharing and cooperation. This group standing at the heart of the people of goodwill contains all those who work with an uncommon degree of focus and concentration on the service of humanity and the creation of right human relations. These Servers recognize the need to be engaged in inner and outer work — to balance and harmonize their inner and outer lives in work that is dedicated to the future well-being of humanity.

Listen to these comments from the Nigerian writer Ben Okri, in an interview published in the latest issue of the New Internationalist. When asked What political or moral issue do you feel most strongly about at the moment? He replied:

The loss of our sense of wholeness, of vision, of a centre. I'm concerned that we always try to change the surface of things without stopping long enough to look into the heart of our predicament. This could be the crisis facing the economy, the environment, Africa or the Middle East. We paper the cracks, we strengthen the pillars, we fix the roof, but we don't look deep into the structural heart of the great issues and sort them out from the steadiness and truth of profound contemplation. It could be any issue; the problem is we suffer the consequences of not looking deeply enough. [New Internationalist, June 2011, p. 62 - see his new book, A Time for New Dreams]

This World Invocation Day let us ponder the quality of activity and of immersion in service — not out of guilt or any desire to impress — but as an expression of the souls focus on the opportunities of transition into Aquarius. Let us see our lives, our communities, our nations as places in which a new perspective of wholeness is struggling to emerge. Let us be part of this emergence and be fully engaged in the struggle. This is not some idealistic call to fanaticism. But it is a call to be active in preparing for the New. And within this is a reminder that to prepare for the new in humanity is also to prepare for a magical event: the Coming of the New Avatar — a Christ, a Maitreya for the civilization of the future. We sometimes forget the true magic of what is happening in our time. Issues like eradicating poverty, creating an economics of sharing at the local, national and global level and a new relationship with the Earth are magical issues. It is through human labor, activity, creativity and imagination that a new world is being born and that world will be initiated by a Great One - just as the civilizations inspired by the faiths of our forebears were initiated by Christ, the Buddha, Mohammed, Lao Tsu, and all the other Avatars. It is our human activity that is drawing forth the Coming One from the Secret Place. The Work of our time is One Work — it involves activity in the "centre where the will of God is known"; activity in the ashrams of the Great Ones on the inner side of life; and activity here, in the "centre which we call the human race".